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HEALTH & SAFETY GUIDELINES FOR COVID-19

Minglewood Hall no longer requires proof of Covid-19 vaccinations or negative Covid-19 tests, unless otherwise required by an artist for their upcoming show.

If you are planning to attend or purchase a ticket to an upcoming show, we ask that you visit that show’s event page on MinglewoodHallMemphis.com to see what Covid-19 policies might be in place, as each show may have different restrictions.

Stay tuned to Minglewood's social media accounts and website for the most up-to-date information.

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HEALTH & SAFETY GUIDELINES FOR COVID-19

Minglewood Hall no longer requires proof of Covid-19 vaccinations or negative Covid-19 tests, unless otherwise required by an artist for their upcoming show.

If you are planning to attend or purchase a ticket to an upcoming show, we ask that you visit that show’s event page on MinglewoodHallMemphis.com to see what Covid-19 policies might be in place, as each show may have different restrictions.

Stay tuned to Minglewood's social media accounts and website for the most up-to-date information.

BENDIGO FLETCHER

Wednesday December 07
Doors 6:00 pm
Starts 6:30 pm
Ages All

BENDIGO FLETCHER
IN THE 1884 LOUNGE

TICKET PRICES:
ADVANCED: $15
DAY OF SHOW: $18


The full-length debut from Bendigo Fletcher, Fits of Laughter is a collection of moments both enchanted and mundane, sorrowful and ecstatic: basking in the beauty of a glorious lightning storm, waking with a strand of your beloved’s hair happily caught in your mouth, drinking malt liquor while bingeing “The X-Files” on a lonesome Saturday night. As lead songwriter for the Louisville, KY-based band, frontman Ryan Anderson crafts the patchwork poetry of his lyrics by serenely observing the world around him, often while working his grocery-store day job or walking aimlessly in nature (a practice partly borrowed from the late poet Mary Oliver). When matched with Bendigo Fletcher’s gorgeously jangly collision of country and folk-rock and dreamy psychedelia, the result is a batch of story-songs graced with so much raw humanity, wildly offbeat humor, and a transcendent sense of wonder.

 

True to its spirit of purposeful wandering, Fits of Laughter unfolds in a wayward yet lushly detailed sound, embroidered with everything from crystalline harmonies to blistering guitar riffs to heady drum-machine beats. For help in forging the album’s ragged elegance, Bendigo Fletcher worked with producer Ken Coomer (the original drummer for Wilco and Uncle Tupelo), whom Anderson met in a flash of strange serendipity. Soon after he’d connected with Coomer via phone and bonded over a shared affection for Pink Floyd’s Obscured by Clouds, the band headed to Nashville to record in Coomer’s Cartoon Moon Studio, laying down the album’s eight songs in nine frenetic days.

 

In keeping with the regional perspective that defines much of folk and country music, Fits of Laughter ponders certain paradoxes inherent in the band’s homeland. “In Kentucky there’s a long-running frustration of tradition and stubbornness versus progress,” says Anderson. “On one side you’re looking at things like the coal industry or Mitch McConnell, but then there’s also a feeling of togetherness and a fuck-the-man attitude and a loving desire for everyone to be left alone.” Referring to Fits of Laughter as a coming-of-age album, Anderson also examines a more internal conflict throughout the songs, including his choice to abandon his medical-school aspirations in favor of pursuing a career in music. “The title’s really about the spectrum of emotions I’ve felt on the way to finding what makes me feel like I’m living truthfully, rather than holding onto what I think other people’s expectations are of me,” he says. “It’s a phrase that bridges all of those emotions—everything from joy to hysteria.”

 

On “Sugar in the Creek”—the groove-heavy opening track to Fits of Laughter—Bendigo Fletcher simultaneously explore those inner and outward tensions, presenting a sweetly rambling dream of escape from the chaos of the modern world. “That song partly has to do with my fantasy of living off the land and how magical that would be,” says Anderson. “I’m from the suburbs, and over the years I’ve made friends who have family farms and I’m really drawn to that way of life, even though I know it’s not all flowers.” One of the album’s most fantastically unhinged moments, “Evergreen” cycles through a series of spellbinding tonal schisms, cresting at a chorus lyric that speaks to the urgency of self-preservation (“I do believe I’m coming around again/When I don't think of anybody other than myself”). “I wrote ‘Evergreen’ in the early stages of admitting to myself that medical school was a path that looked way more obscured than working to make records,” says Anderson. “I was also getting into self-care methods for the first time in my life, and realizing that you have to take time for yourself in order to be the best and truest version of yourself for everyone else—so in a way, that’s a form of service.” And on “Astro Pup,” Bendigo Fletcher deliver an epic heartbreak anthem spiked with heavenly harmonies and radiant banjo melodies, its lyrics illuminating the ingenuity of Anderson’s self-effacing wit (“I am dog hair all over your bed/I live in the house of the misbehaved”).

 

As Bendigo Fletcher’s first time working with an outside producer, Fits of Laughter draws much of its freewheeling energy from the deliberately unfussy nature of their recording sessions. “Going into working with Ken, we felt confident that we wanted to retain the jangly sweetness of the music we’ve made in the past,” says Anderson, who created Bendigo Fletcher’s 2015 debut EP Consensual Wisdom on his own and later filled out the band’s lineup in a process he describes as “a gradual adding of members who are all natural friends.” “There’s loose ends and missed beats that we didn’t intend to make happen, but those moments always feel really special when they’re resolved—it sounds like a band actually playing together,” he adds. At the same time, Fits of Laughter bears an undeniable immediacy, thanks in part to the band’s decision to limit the tracklist to eight essential songs (a move largely inspired by extraordinarily lean and iconic albums like Television’s Marquee Moon).

 

In expounding on the observational quality of his songwriting, Anderson points to some invaluable insight gleaned from Dr. Tim Lake, a renowned musician and composer with whom he studied banjo back in college. “Tim’s a great symbol of Kentucky to me—someone who tells it like is, but is also a very true-hearted and generous person,” says Anderson. “He really drove home the idea that in order to be a thoughtful musician and songwriter, especially if you want to play folk music, you have to be a student of history and the world around you.” Naming John Prine among his formative influences, Anderson has since fully devoted himself to that approach. “Songs seem to spark from those moments of responding to the mundane and sometimes bewildering aspect of the human experience,” he says. “In the past few years I’ve taken to manual-labor jobs so that I can do that while I’m stacking apples or whatever else. If a lyric ever comes into my head and makes me laugh or makes me tear up, I know I need to build it into something that’s going to be fun to sing over and over again.”

 

Through the lifespan of Bendigo Fletcher, Anderson has found that those spontaneously composed lyrics tend to resonate most powerfully with the audience. And in sharing Fits of Laughter with the world, the band hopes to guide listeners toward a deeper trust in their own intuition and instinct. “There’s always going to be other people’s opinions and judgments and ideas on how to live, and more often than not, those ideas come from a place of love” says Anderson. “But ultimately every person knows what truth feels like, as opposed to artifice or putting up walls to get through something you feel you’re expected to do. I suppose these songs are sort of my offering to others, to encourage them to look for that feeling in their own lives, and then follow through on it.”

HEALTH & SAFETY GUIDELINES FOR COVID-19

Minglewood Hall no longer requires proof of Covid-19 vaccinations or negative Covid-19 tests, unless otherwise required by an artist for their upcoming show.

If you are planning to attend or purchase a ticket to an upcoming show, we ask that you visit that show’s event page on MinglewoodHallMemphis.com to see what Covid-19 policies might be in place, as each show may have different restrictions.

Stay tuned to Minglewood's social media accounts and website for the most up-to-date information.

THE FRONT BOTTOMS

Wednesday December 07
Doors 6:30 pm
Starts 7:30 pm
Ages All

THE FRONT BOTTOMS
SPECIAL GUEST SYDNEY SPRAGUE
IN THE MAIN ROOM

TICKET PRICE:
ADVANCED: $27
DAY OF SHOW: $32

When you turn on a record from The Front Bottoms, you hear the trials, tribulations, and triumphs of two lifelong friends who stare down personal tragedy and the madness of a world gone haywire by simply playing a little louder together. The duo—Brian Sella [vocals, guitar] and Mat Uychich [drums]—spin all of these emotions into a tapestry of punk, folk, and alternative on their new full-length album, In Sickness & In Flames.

“When you listen to this, I definitely want you to feel the anxiety,” affirms Brian. “There are some pretty rock and roll songs and heavy moments on In Sickness & In Flames. I hope the tension comes across. We went through all of these unbelievable life changes, and then all of these insane things happened in the world. If you get anything out of it, we want it to be that creativity can basically solve any problem and will save us. This was made from a tense place. Look around. You literally see sickness and flames right now, but we can grow from it. Metaphorically for The Front Bottoms and the community, we’re basically saying, ‘There’s a lot of craziness happening, but here’s an album out of it’. This is the creativity we need to keep our heads above water.”

They’ve shared in that same creativity since back in grade school. The New Jersey natives began performing in high school bands and after Brian finished college, The Front Bottoms officially formed. Brian’s mom gifted the boys 12 hours of recording time at a local studio for Christmas, resulting in their 2011 self-titled independent debut. A whirlwind of prolific output and countless gigs followed. The Front Bottoms reached a critical peak with 2017’s Going Grey. It received praise from the likes of The FADER, Stereogum, VICE, A.V. Club, and more. Along the way, the band performed on Late Night with Seth Meyers and NPR’s “Tiny Desk,” graced the stages of Coachella, Lollapalooza, Austin City Limits and Bonnaroo, and toured with the likes of Blink-182, Manchester Orchestra, and many more. Not to mention, the group has tallied nearly 100 million streams, sold over 500,000 album equivalents, and launched the annual holiday festival Champagne Jam, which expands year over year at an unprecedented rate.

Their union only grew strong with each subsequent show and release.

“It wouldn’t be The Front Bottoms, if there wasn’t a partnership. We just naturally always progressed by figuring everything out together,” smiles Mat.

“He handles the business though...I need to call him to find out my social security number,” laughs Brian.

However, it seemed like life began testing them last year. In between tracking everywhere from their New Jersey home studio to the famed Sonic Ranch in El Paso, TX on the Mexican border, the guys assembled what would become In Sickness & In Flames. Following an appendicitis diagnosis, Brian underwent emergency surgery in December. The property they co-owned as a creative hive caught fire and burned down. Still, the musicians soldiered on.

“It felt like every time we came home, some other shit would happen,” recalls Brian. “Finally, we finished the album, and the pandemic hit.”

In the middle of this upheaval, they introduced the record with “camouflage.” A palm-muted verse rolls towards caustic confessions like, “Think I was having a mental breakdown the same time you were painting your walls.

“It goes back to this idea of wanting to connect with nature, disappear into the background and blend in,” Brian explains. “I wouldn’t normally wear camo, but it’s how I feel sometimes.”

A wall of distortion absorbs lush strings on “everyone blooms” as it blossoms into a grand chorus.

“It follows the overarching themes of growing up, coming into your own, and realizing everything you’ve been told is a lie,” says Mat. “Flowers all bloom, but not at the same time. I’ve always related to late bloomers. Everyone grows at his or her own pace. There’s no rush.”

On the single “montgomery forever,” a nimble bass line crashes into fleet-fingered acoustic fretwork and a call-and-response chant, “We used to live here; now they’re blowing it up.

“There was a public housing building called Montgomery that was going to be demolished in Jersey City,” says Brian. “My girlfriend and I woke up early at like 8am to see it, and the city blew it up. It was super emotional and intense. As I was walking back to my apartment, there was a woman with a shirt that said, ‘Montgomery Forever’. I definitely saw her emotion. These were people’s homes. It’s the emotion of losing everything. It sparked the inspiration for me.”

“Fairbanks, Alaska” hinges on a thought-provoking visual as Brian admits, “I haven’t checked my mind since I saw the Northern Lights of Fairbanks, Alaska.Refracting a burst of raw energy, a rattling scream quakes through “leaf pile.” On the other end of the spectrum, the record closes out on the sparse piano of the poetic ballad “make way.”

“The original thinking of In Sickness & In Flames related to me getting married,” Brian reveals. “However, it makes even more sense now. We needed all of this crazy stuff to happen to make the album, and now it speaks to the times for us.”

However, as with everything The Front Bottoms have done, it speaks beyond the times as well. “Everything’s been bad news, but we hope this is good news for our fans,” Mat closes out. “We’re just

documenting our lives through music.”

“We’ve dedicated our entire lives to this,” Brian leaves off. “It’s the creative expression of what we’ve been going through. Because of that, we keep getting closer and growing up.”

BOILER

When you turn on a record from The Front Bottoms, you hear the trials, tribulations, and triumphs of two lifelong friends who stare down personal tragedy and the madness of a world gone haywire by simply playing a little louder together.

The New Jersey natives went from playing in the woods to performing in high school bands. After Brian finished college, The Front Bottoms officially formed. Brian’s mom gifted the boys 12 hours of recording time for Christmas, resulting in their 2011 self-titled independent debut. A whirlwind of prolific output and countless gigs followed. The Front Bottoms reached a critical peak with 2017’s Going Grey. It received praise from the likes of The FADER, Stereogum, VICE, A.V. Club, and more. Along the way, the band performed on Late Night with Seth Meyers and NPR’s “Tiny Desk,” graced the stages of Coachella, Austin City Limits, and Bonnaroo, and toured with the likes of Blink-182, Manchester Orchestra, and many more. Not to mention, the group has tallied nearly 100 million streams, sold over 500,000 album equivalents, and launched the annual holiday festival Champagne Jam, which expands year over year at an unprecedented rate. Overcoming a series of challenges, the duo—Brian Sella [vocals, guitar] and Mat Uychich [drums]—spin raw emotions into a tapestry of punk, folk, and alternative on their fifth full-length

and second album for Fueled By Ramen, In Sickness & In Flames, led by the singles “camouflage,” “everyone blooms,” and “montgomery forever.”

HEALTH & SAFETY GUIDELINES FOR COVID-19

Minglewood Hall no longer requires proof of Covid-19 vaccinations or negative Covid-19 tests, unless otherwise required by an artist for their upcoming show.

If you are planning to attend or purchase a ticket to an upcoming show, we ask that you visit that show’s event page on MinglewoodHallMemphis.com to see what Covid-19 policies might be in place, as each show may have different restrictions.

Stay tuned to Minglewood's social media accounts and website for the most up-to-date information.

GIMME GIMME DISCO

Saturday December 10
Doors 7:30 pm
Starts 8:30 pm
Ages 18+

Calling all Dancing Queens! Here we go again! If you can’t get enough ABBA then do we have a dance party for you. We are a DJ based dance party playing all your favorite ABBA hits, plus plenty of other disco hits from the 70s & 80's like The Bee Gees, Donna Summer, & Cher (DISCO ATTIRE ENCOURAGED). So honey honey, take-a-chance and you’ll be dancing all night long. Grab tickets, bring your friends, and have the best night of your life! 

HEALTH & SAFETY GUIDELINES FOR COVID-19

Minglewood Hall no longer requires proof of Covid-19 vaccinations or negative Covid-19 tests, unless otherwise required by an artist for their upcoming show.

If you are planning to attend or purchase a ticket to an upcoming show, we ask that you visit that show’s event page on MinglewoodHallMemphis.com to see what Covid-19 policies might be in place, as each show may have different restrictions.

Stay tuned to Minglewood's social media accounts and website for the most up-to-date information.

Take On Me: 80s New Wave

Saturday January 14
Doors 7:30 pm
Starts 8:30 pm
Ages 18+

A New Wave Dance Party

HEALTH & SAFETY GUIDELINES FOR COVID-19

Minglewood Hall no longer requires proof of Covid-19 vaccinations or negative Covid-19 tests, unless otherwise required by an artist for their upcoming show.

If you are planning to attend or purchase a ticket to an upcoming show, we ask that you visit that show’s event page on MinglewoodHallMemphis.com to see what Covid-19 policies might be in place, as each show may have different restrictions.

Stay tuned to Minglewood's social media accounts and website for the most up-to-date information.

DESTROY LONELY

Friday January 27
Doors 7:00 pm
Starts 8:00 pm
Ages All

Destroy Lonely makes every flex feel like an adventure. Fusing colorful melodies with labyrinthine flows and playful braggadocio, the Atlanta rapper has built a career by pushing himself to try new things—and pushing at rap’s boundaries in the process. The 21-year-old weaves together video-game synths, elastic vocals, off-kilter rhythms, and his inborn mystique and charisma to craft stylish soundtracks for a high-wire lifestyle that’s getting more luxurious by the day. His daring approach is on fuller display than ever on “NOSTYLIST,” the mesmerizing first single from NO STYLIST, his debut mixtape on Playboi Carti’s record imprint Opium. 

 

Spitting over Technicolor keys, Destroy Lonely combines high-roller escapades with an icy disregard for potential enemies. “Yeah, I fucked that hoe, but I can’t cuff her, I won’t make her Mrs.,” he raps. “I don’t know that boy, and I can’t tell you how he end up missing.” Meanwhile, on “JETLGGD,” he unloads rapid-fire flows over racing hi-hats and surreal sonar bleeps, laying out a day of drink, smoke, and fun with international women, all without losing the beat. Free-wheeling yet possessed with the technical proficiency to rhyme in unpredictable ways, Destroy Lonely threads disparate ideas with spontaneity and imagination—a side effect of being someone more comfortable rapping than they are speaking. 

 

“I feel like when I’m talking to people talking to people in conversation, they won’t completely understand me,” he says. “When I make music, I’m able to say exactly what I want to say.”

 

The young artist born Bobby Sandimanie III began developing his truest language early on. “My pops told me he used to look in the backseat and I’d be freestyling shit when I was four or five,” he remembers. Before too long, Lonely discovered the sounds of artists like Eminem, Green Day, Gorillaz, Lil Wayne, and Earl Sweatshirt, a kaleidoscopic blend of artists that helped him develop his combination of melodically rich yet mechanically sharp rap skills. 

 

Soon, Lonely crystallized a version of the style he uses today. At age 17, began dropping fully realized projects, demonstrating an already visionary approach to rap on efforts like Forever, ILY, Underworld, Overseas, and </3² on SoundCloud, each earning thousands more streams than the last. When his 2019 single “Bane” blew up, Destroy Lonely’s path to stardom began to solidify. His rise was cemented when he met Carti in early 2021, who was taken by his groundbreaking sounds, and by the end of the year, he’d signed a deal with his fellow Atlanta rapper’s Opium label. 

 

With a fan base that grows every day, Lonely understands his position—and the gift of a platform. In July, he hit the stage to perform in front of thousands at Rolling Loud Miami. And soon he’s hitting the road with Ken Carson’s X-Man Tour after making a typically charismatic appearance on Carson’s single “MDMA” earlier this year. 

 

NO STYLIST will give fans a lot more to be grateful for. It’s composed of nimble flows and all the mellifluous half-sung lyrics that propelled Lonely to stardom, but the rhymes are more decisive, the soundscapes more pristine, and the identity even more distinct. It’s another evolution of Destroy Lonely, an artist who’s made his name off of never slowing down, never being content. 

“This is where I get to finally show people who the fuck I am within my own rules and my own jurisdiction. It’s like when the roller coaster is going up,” he says. “But it’s never gonna go down.” 

HEALTH & SAFETY GUIDELINES FOR COVID-19

Minglewood Hall no longer requires proof of Covid-19 vaccinations or negative Covid-19 tests, unless otherwise required by an artist for their upcoming show.

If you are planning to attend or purchase a ticket to an upcoming show, we ask that you visit that show’s event page on MinglewoodHallMemphis.com to see what Covid-19 policies might be in place, as each show may have different restrictions.

Stay tuned to Minglewood's social media accounts and website for the most up-to-date information.

Colter Wall

Wednesday February 15
Doors 7:00 pm
Starts 8:00 pm
Ages All

COLTER WALL
WITH SPECIAL GUEST VINCENT NEIL EMERSON

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2023
DOORS: 7PM / SHOW: 8PM

ALL AGES

TICKET PRICES:
ADV: 35 | DOS: 40

• • • • • • • • • •

Between seasons on the ranch, Colter Wall plays songs of the authentic West and traditional country music. From the prairies of southern Saskatchewan, his songs have been heard in movies and hit television shows such as Yellowstone, Bad Sisters, and Peripheral. "Cypress Hills and the Big Country" is his latest single.

HEALTH & SAFETY GUIDELINES FOR COVID-19

Minglewood Hall no longer requires proof of Covid-19 vaccinations or negative Covid-19 tests, unless otherwise required by an artist for their upcoming show.

If you are planning to attend or purchase a ticket to an upcoming show, we ask that you visit that show’s event page on MinglewoodHallMemphis.com to see what Covid-19 policies might be in place, as each show may have different restrictions.

Stay tuned to Minglewood's social media accounts and website for the most up-to-date information.

Niko Moon

Thursday February 23
Doors 7:00 pm
Starts 8:00 pm
Ages All

TICKETS
$20 | ADVANCE
$25 | AT THE DOOR

Niko Moon has really clear memories. Music, cars, school. How much his parents loved each other, created a place where life was an adventure – and what you had was all you needed.

 

His dad, a drummer turned truck driver, loved old cars. As a boy, he remembers a Falcon, “red interior, and the carpet. The way it smelled.” He used to love to pile in with his dad, riding around, going to get donuts

– and listening to music.

 

“I was 8 or 9, and I didn’t get it,” he laughs. “It was John Prine. My dad’s favorite was ‘One Red Rose.’ It’s funny. I knew all the words. I’d be singing along without a clue, but loving it... loving the line ‘What I never knew, I never will forget...’”

 

Like Prine, Moon’s finger is on simple things that really matter; easy joy and how to find it, loving where you are and finding ways to write about it so everyone – the really smart, the can’t be-bothered – can find their way to the bliss. It’s what Moon seeks to capture and sow in his songs.

 

Growing up an hour outside of Atlanta, back when it was country not exurbia, life moved at a different pace. People knew each other, took their time, shared a meal on Sunday with their family and pitched in when someone needed a hand.

 

Moon wanted to extract the essence of growing up in small-town Georgia. Banjo forward, swaggy back beat, guitars that tang as much as twang. Sonic tags, melodies that tumble and moments that embody all the warm welcome and friendliness that defined his life as a kid listening to his mama play Alison Krauss in her car, his debut album GOOD TIME creates an old school sort of country ethos that also drags a bit of Michael Franti, Prine, the Eagles and Outkast through songs that simmer, stir and sizzle in all the right places.

 

“In middle school, I started having my own opinions about everything,” he’s quick to offer. “Nirvana, Offspring, Green Day, Sister Hazel, Outkast, Tupac, Biggie. That drum and bass rhythm section of hip- hop, I just fell in love with. Didn’t know what they were talking about, either, but I really loved the way the drums knocked me out!

 

“My hair was all long. I was wearing basketball jerseys, JNCOs, playing hacky sack before school. I didn’t know what I was, so I was taking it all in, trying to figure out who I was.”

 

All of it turned out to be more than anyone could’ve bargained for. A musically curious kid, he remembers watching his dad practicing drums in the garage. “I got chills. I couldn’t comprehend how he was doing it,” he remembers. “I was so little, but he was in a touring regional country/rock band, had hair down to his waist. He gave it up, made the decision it was better for his family to just drive. I always respected him for that. You know, he was getting up at 4 a.m. to provide for his family.


“But he was such a fan of music, of songwriters. To just sit and listen to what they did with the story and the language. He – and my mom, who had the sweetest voice – were always singing to me. There’s a rhythm to that, too.”

 

That rhythm is shot through every track on GOOD TIME, a self-cultivated positivity starter kit. Whether the staccato/dobro punctuated laundry list of ‘can’ts’ that forms “GOOD AT LOVING YOU,” the double entendre “WAY BACK,” the slinky, finger-snapping “SMALL TOWN STATE OF MIND,” or the strummy philosophy of “WITHOUT SAYIN’ A WORD,” Moon recognizes you can’t have heart without the beat.

 

“The rhythm, the groove, the lyric: it’s all important,” he protests, trying to home in on his sweet spot. “The songwriter in me says it’s the words; but at the end of the day, it’s the rhythm. Rhythm’s the more elemental thing. The head and the heart, right? The heart is deeper a lot of time, and I want my music to move people. When they love the way it makes them feel, they’ll get there. But... I want to reach the ones who love the lyric, who really focus on what you’re saying, too.”

 

If the secret sauce is the alchemy, it’s been years in the slow-steeping. Not only did Moon produce Franti’s acclaimed Stay Human, Vol. 2, he’s been the secret weapon for Zac Brown for almost a decade. In love with music, the young kid caught up with the circus, “back at the Dixie Tavern on Wednesday nights, 200 people with the line wrapped around the bar and across the back. ‘Chicken Fried,’ ‘Toes,’ ‘Free,’ yes, but he would do Metallica, Rage Against the Machine, Keith Whitley. And his picking, there’s always a hook built into the chord, even when he’s just playing G, C, D.”

 

Writing, traveling, seeing the world, Moon absorbed a precision and commitment to music that was exacting, even as it embodied simple pleasures. “Everyone in that band is so good. Spending 10 years watching them arrange and create was intense. Relentlessly authentic and refusing to adapt to other people’s ideas of what you should be was a real lesson.”

 

Ten years was also spent living the life. In the rock & roll Jetstream, Moon confesses, “I had it in my mind to be a real artist you had to live this life: always moving on, lonely, smoking a lot of cigarettes, lots of girls, drugs and drinking. That Jack Kerouac way of you have to suffer a little to really be an artist. But that was a story I invented...”

 

Tragedy collided with magic. With an engagement imploding in the most high-impact way – see the sinewy “DRUNK OVER YOU” – Moon sought higher ground. Young, talented and good-looking, it was easy to shut off, shutdown and remain aloof. But that’s when he met Anna, who Facebook friended him after a photographer she was thinking of using showed her Moon’s picture in his photo portfolio.

 

“I was playing Atlanta, so I invited her to the show,” the reformed player remembers. “She came,

and was so beautiful. I thought we were gonna hang out, but she stayed two minutes, told me she liked the show and left.”

 

A proper date, a real conversation and the news that she, too, was a songwriter intrigued him. Unaware that she’d already appeared in Italian Vogue, he asked her to play a song. He was stunned. “She didn’t know how good she was.”

 

Smiling now, he confesses, “I was in love at first sight, but that creative force changed everything. I knew she’d understand me, get me – and while she was from an hour north of Atlanta and I was from an hour west of Atlanta, we were basically from the same small town.”


Though they were writing for her UK pop deal, they never stopped collaborating. As importantly, they had fun. Even in the lean years, the pair created joy where they were with what they had – and it seeped into their songs, their sounds and the way they saw the world.

 

“I’ve never cared about playing solos, only how the songs feel,” Moon explains. “When I was renting a room from my buddy for $200 a month and making $100 a night, Anna was right there, and she got that, too. She still does.

 

“We were lying in bed one night, talking and ‘LAST CALL’ just dropped out. The last line of the chorus, ‘If lovers are like alcohol, then you’re my last call...’ It hit home, because I’d been drinking so heavy when I met her, I was missing all the good stuff. Then I met her, and well, you hear the songs.”

 

The songs, absolutely. The cascading wonders of the world “DIAMOND,” which his lover overwhelmingly outshines, the arcing be-in-the-moment “LET IT RIDE,” the harmony slathered “NO SAD SONGS” and the 2x Platinum No. 1 debut single “GOOD TIME” all bear witness to Moon’s hybrid sound and spirit. “When you’re in a beautiful moment, soak that up, bring it in and watermark your memories with a song, with these songs. Find a way to remember...

 

“I got a tattoo that says, ‘This, too, shall pass.’ Me and my dad both did, because he used to tell me that, and it’s true. If you can find ways to remember, to hold on to the feelings and everything in that moment, that’s the deal. It’s so simple: I’m the first person to tell you I’m just trying to make people happy. Life is so short; you’re here, and then you’re gone. I want to enjoy every moment – and if (the songs) are the best thing we can give people, do for each other, then I’m all about it.”

 

So much so, that Moon holed up at home and started playing around with sounds, rhythms, grooves and Miss Anna Moon. Between them, they crafted 14 songs that distill the essence of who they are, how they were raised, where they grew up and the things that matter. Laughing, he says, “Finding Anna was really finding myself. We both exist in this music, in these songs – and in this life, what makes you happy is love, whether Anna or your friends, your family and the way you choose to see the world. These songs, I hope, create a space to pick the beauty in a bad day... and make you bob your head a little.”

 

Moon’s latest effort, COASTIN’, is available now.

HEALTH & SAFETY GUIDELINES FOR COVID-19

Minglewood Hall no longer requires proof of Covid-19 vaccinations or negative Covid-19 tests, unless otherwise required by an artist for their upcoming show.

If you are planning to attend or purchase a ticket to an upcoming show, we ask that you visit that show’s event page on MinglewoodHallMemphis.com to see what Covid-19 policies might be in place, as each show may have different restrictions.

Stay tuned to Minglewood's social media accounts and website for the most up-to-date information.

Big Head Todd & The Monsters

Sunday March 19
Doors 7:00 pm
Starts 8:00 pm
Ages All

TICKET PRICES:
ADVANCE: $35 | AT THE DOOR: 40

Big Head Todd and The Monsters have quietly become an American institution following three and a half decades of writing, recording, and touring (totaling over 3,500 performances). After countless sold out shows in amphitheaters and on the high seas, beaming their tunes to outer space (literally), earning the endorsement of everyone from Robert Plant to The Denver Broncos, and tallying tens of millions of streams, Big Head Todd and The Monsters cite the friendships formed in the crowd among their proudest accomplishments. Fast forward to 2021 and the Colorado quartet—Todd Park Mohr [vocals, guitar, keys, sax, harmonica], Brian Nevin [drums, percussion], Rob Squires [bass, vocals], and Jeremy Lawton [guitar, keys, vocals, steel guitar]—continue to unite audiences.

“Friendships have spawned because of our band,” smiles Todd. “Maybe a bit like the Grateful Dead, the line between audience and stage has over time become a bit blurred and many lifelong friendships have been made in every direction. I’m very proud of that. Bringing people together and sharing a joy for a couple of hours is an important function of music. Music can cultivate community, even harmony. We need that!”

Fittingly, the guys in the band began as friends as well. Todd and Brian first crossed paths in high school jazz band circa 1982. Soon, the guys started to jam in Brian’s basement also joined by Rob. Sweat-soaked house party gigs and talent shows followed until they became a fixture on the bar circuit “before I was even old enough to drink,” laughs Todd. As perennial outliers, the musicians performed original material at these formative gigs, standing out from a bevy of cover bands in the scene at the time.

Adopting the moniker Big Head Todd & The Monsters, they served up their independent debut Another Mayberry in 1989 and Midnight Radio in 1990 to critical acclaim, setting the stage for their seminal 1993 breakout Sister Sweetly. Powered by staples “Broken Hearted Savior,” “It’s Alright,” and “Bittersweet,” it eventually went platinum, and they supported Plant on tour. At the time, Variety hailed Todd as “a soulful singer and nimble lead guitarist,” while The Los Angeles Times claimed, “Mohr, who has a voice like smoke, writes great songs that incorporates blues, folk, rock and country, which sounds sort of like, well, Big Head Todd and the Monsters.”

Throughout the next decade, the group presented fan favorites such as Strategem [1994] and Beautiful World [1997]. The latter yielded the cover of “Boom Boom” [feat. John Lee Hooker], which famously served as the theme to NCIS: New Orleans. In 2005, they exceeded our atmosphere altogether. Friends with connections to NASA encouraged Todd to write a song for NASA, so they ignited 2005’s “Blue Sky.” In 2011, Big Head Todd and The Monsters played “Blue Sky” live from the middle of Mission Control to awaken the astronauts aboard the shuttle. 2017 saw them release New World Arisin’ to fan adoration and critical acclaim. Glide Magazine claimed, “such tracks, like most of this music, radiate a sense of optimism and purpose ever so welcome in these fragmented times.”

Along the way, the band joined the Denver Broncos on their Super Bowl victory parade, delivering a triumphant performance to boot. Not to mention, they’ve headlined their own cruise multiple times and introduced Rockin’ the Reef as a five-night musical extravaganza in Jewel Paradise Cove in Runaway Bay Jamaica for 2022.

Big Head Todd and The Monsters took the stage at hallowed hometown haunt Red Rocks Amphitheatre a staggering 32 times. In June 2021, they made a rapturous homecoming to Red Rocks for their first full capacity gig at the venue post-COVID. Chronicling the gig, 303 Magazine described the group as “a longtime pal that has defined Colorado’s blues-rock scene for multiple decades.”

“The Red Rocks performances have all been special to me,” Todd goes on. “Growing up in Colorado, I always loved going to shows there as a teenager. I’m super proud of that. The COVID year was really unique, because we played there four times before finally getting back in front of a packed house. It meant a lot to all of us.”

In 2019, the band instituted another fan favorite tradition, by launching Monsters Music Monthly. They revealed a free song and video on a monthly basis, including “Hoochie Coochie Man” [feat. Buddy Guy], “Rosalita” [feat. John Popper of Blues Traveler], “Remedy” [feat. Ronnie Baker Brooks], “Sunshine of Your Love” [feat. David Hidalgo], and more. Todd and Co. have notably managed to collaborate or perform with a myriad of their heroes over the years, namely Neil Young, B.B. King, Allman Brothers, John Prine, Albert Collins, James Cotton, John Lee Hooker, Hubert Sumlin, and dozens more.

“For a half-Asian kid growing up in Littleton, Colorado, it’s not likely I would’ve ever ended up being as involved in blues music as I have been,” he observes. “It’s unbelievable we’ve gotten to play and even record with some of my idols.”

In the end, Big Head Todd and The Monsters will never stop bringing crowds together. In fact, they’ll hit the road yet again for a full-scale US tour in winter 2022 with more on the horizon.

“If I had any message for our listeners, it would just be, ‘Thank you’,” he leaves off. “We’re so fortunate to have lives making music. We’re grateful to be in the situation we’re in, and we’re going to continue as long as we can.”

HEALTH & SAFETY GUIDELINES FOR COVID-19

Minglewood Hall no longer requires proof of Covid-19 vaccinations or negative Covid-19 tests, unless otherwise required by an artist for their upcoming show.

If you are planning to attend or purchase a ticket to an upcoming show, we ask that you visit that show’s event page on MinglewoodHallMemphis.com to see what Covid-19 policies might be in place, as each show may have different restrictions.

Stay tuned to Minglewood's social media accounts and website for the most up-to-date information.

Outback Presents

MIRANDA SINGS LIVE

Saturday April 01
Doors 6:00 pm
Starts 7:00 pm
Ages All

Miranda Sings Live
with special guest Colleen Ballinger

Colleen Ballinger is a multi hyphenate; actor, comedian, trained vocalist, writer and executive producer. She is best known for portraying her character, ‘Miranda Sings,’ a personality that is the polar opposite of Ms. Ballinger. Colleen has amassed over 65 Million followers across her social media and passed 5 billion views on YouTube. She can currently be seen as ‘Miranda’ on the Netflix Original series, HATERS BACK OFF, which she created and executive-produced. Her one hour special, “Miranda Sings Live...Your Welcome” is also available on Netflix.

Colleen has appeared in Jerry Seinfeld’s COMEDIANS IN CARS GETTING COFFEE, RALPH BREAKS THE INTERNET, THE TONIGHT SHOW WITH JIMMY FALLON, ANGRY BIRDS 2, and ESCAPE THE NIGHT. Ballinger is also a New York Times #1 Bestselling Author with two books, SELF-HELP and MY DIARRHE.

Colleen’s dream of starring on Broadway came true with her 2019 debut as ‘Dawn’ in the hit musical WAITRESS, and she is currently on tour with her new show, “Who Wants My Kid?” More information on that can be found at MirandaSings.com.

HEALTH & SAFETY GUIDELINES FOR COVID-19

Minglewood Hall no longer requires proof of Covid-19 vaccinations or negative Covid-19 tests, unless otherwise required by an artist for their upcoming show.

If you are planning to attend or purchase a ticket to an upcoming show, we ask that you visit that show’s event page on MinglewoodHallMemphis.com to see what Covid-19 policies might be in place, as each show may have different restrictions.

Stay tuned to Minglewood's social media accounts and website for the most up-to-date information.

Polyphia

Tuesday April 11
Doors 7:00 pm
Starts 8:00 pm
Ages All

TICKET PRICES:
GA ADVANCE: $28 / AT THE DOOR: $32

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